There’s a first time for everything…

It was the first commercial airplane to break the 1,000-sales mark. It was the first Boeing jet to use triple-slotted flaps and the first to have an APU. Following in the footsteps of the 707, this t-tail trijet was designed for use at smaller airports with shorter runways.

Announced in December 1960, it rolled out two years later and first took to the skies Feb. 9, 1963. After a 22-year production run, more than 1,800 were built.

It was introduced with Eastern Airlines in 1964 and made its last commercial passenger flight just last year with Iran Aseman Airlines, bringing its 55-year career to a close. Even though it’s no longer flying people on regularly scheduled routes, a dozen or so are still flying — mostly as freighters.

Yes, I’m talking about the Boeing 727. It’s an airplane I logically assumed I would never set foot on, but this weekend that logic was quickly proven to be incorrect.

I had the opportunity to spend Saturday afternoon at Kansas City International Airport, where I rode around the airfield with my friend Adam, who works in airport operations. He and his colleague Nicole — who I had the opportunity to meet with earlier this year — are truly two of the nicest, most knowledgeable people I’ve been fortunate to meet in this industry. It’s always a treat to meet others who share my passion for aviation.

On Saturday, I got an up-close look at the handful of airplanes Delta still has in storage at MCI, and a front row seat to shoot photos of planes taking off and landing. We also drove over to the overhaul base where a lot of larger aircraft are undergoing refurbishment or being parted out — it’s always bittersweet to see these big, beautiful birds being torn apart.

While most of the aircraft that hang out at the base are owned by airlines that utilize the space or maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) companies like Jet Midwest, one plane is actually owned by the airport. It’s a 727-200 that began its career in 1978 with Braniff, before being converted to a freighter in 1990 and serving with FedEx till 2012, at which point it began its well-earned retirement at MCI. I’d seen this particular plane before, and was of course happy to see it again… but nothing can compare to the sheer joy I experienced when I was offered the chance to climb aboard.

Adam lowered the Airstair and we slowly climbed up the steps, with a Pratt & Whitney JT8D on either side just outside the windows, and the third just overhead in the tail cone. The plane was dark and slightly dusty… but boy was it awesome to view it from the inside out. We made our way up toward the cockpit and I had the chance to sit in the left seat where I carefully inspected all of the instruments. There was of course a third seat behind the first officer’s for the now-obsolete flight engineer — quite different from today’s flight decks!

I’ll admit I was really hoping to post this blog on Monday (you know, on 7/27) but after the four-hour drive home from Kansas City, I just didn’t have it in me to finish writing. And this experience was so unique and so special, I knew I had to do it justice… so approaching it with fresh eyes was the way to go.

Thank you again to Adam for hosting me — it was an amazing experience and I can’t wait to come back!


3 thoughts on “There’s a first time for everything…”

  1. Great article and great airplane……I did my Flight Engineer check ride on a Federal Express, as it was known then, 727-100 named “Tina Marie” that the school I was attending leased for several of us to complete the airplane check ride part of the training. Later I flew about 4500 hours in the 727 for several companies as Flight Engineer and First Officer before moving on to L-1011s and 747-200s.Today I Captain a 737-200….yes there are still a few of these flying in the US….our company has 6 currently……

    Liked by 1 person

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