Help animals in need, order a 2022 TGP calendar!

I love aviation. Whether it’s flying, taking photos of airplanes, or watching aviation-themed movies – it’s something that brings me great joy. 

I’m also a huge animal lover. I’ll always go out of my way to help an animal in need, and in fact it was my love of animals that led me to become a vegetarian five years ago. I grew up with cats and dogs – all rescues – and today I couldn’t imagine life without my two best friends: Beans (top) and Buddy.

One of my all-time favorite animal-related experiences was back in my hometown of Minneapolis in 2014, helping to kick off the Animal Humane Society (AHS) “Community Cats” program. Community Cats works to improve the lives of free-roaming and feral cats and reduce the unnecessary euthanasia of healthy cats that are not suitable for adoption.

The program was already in the works when I stumbled upon a litter of kittens outside the parking garage of my Loring Park apartment. Working with AHS, I was able to safely live-trap all of the kittens, who were subsequently spayed/neutered and adopted, as well as the mother, who was spayed and then released back into the wild – the first of roughly 250 cats to be released in the program’s first five months.

You can read more about my experience with Community Cats on page 16 of the Spring/Summer 2015 Animal Tracks magazine.

Last year, I sold calendars featuring my aviation photography, with 100% of the profits going to Wings of Hope – we were able to donate $1,000! Since it was such a success, I figured we needed to do something again this year, which is why I’m selling 2022 calendars with 100% of the profits going to Los Angeles-based Pet Rescue Pilots, a fantastic organization that flies pets out of shelters and brings them safely to rescue groups, fosters and forever homes.

Calendars are $25 each and available to order through Monday, Nov. 15. Please, if you’re able, support this great organization and help get these animals to their forever homes!

Buy a 2022 The Great Planes calendar now

An afternoon with the legendary Bob Parks

As a World War II veteran, an incredibly talented artist, an esteemed aviator and a genuinely good person, Bob Parks is a legend.

Born in 1926, Parks enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Forces at age 17 after graduating high school. He served as a crewmember in a number of different aircraft, from trainers to transports and bombers. After being discharged from the military in 1945, he attended Duke University and also received his pilot’s license. He then joined The Boeing Company where he worked in a number of positions over the course of nearly 50 years, including as a production illustrator on the XB-52.

Throughout his remarkable military and aviation career, Parks was constantly sketching or painting. His artwork garnered much attention throughout his life and today is on display in a number of different corporate offices and museums across the country, including the prestigious Smithsonian.

Additionally, Parks was commissioned to do illustrations for Ernest Gann in Flying Magazine and perhaps most notably for the author’s famous book, Ernest Gann’s Flying Circus.

I had the pleasure of meeting Parks and his lovely wife Judy in their Seattle-area home last week, where a handful of current and former Boeing employees had the chance to look through dozens of Parks’ drawings and paintings, including landscapes, portraits and — of course — airplanes.

I also got to sit down with him and hear stories about the inspiration behind many of his paintings. The amount of thought and detail that went into each one of them is unreal… from the color of the sweeping sands in the Sahara Desert to the chamois cloth used to filter out whatever junk was in the aviation fuel — every detail needed to be just right.

I purchased two stunning prints: one of the famous Boeing 367-80 or “Dash 80” and one of a Northwest Airlines Boeing 377 Stratocruiser — the latter appears in Ernest Gann’s Flying Circus.

I can’t say enough good things about Bob Parks. I am eternally grateful to have met him and to now be able to call him a friend. Parks is, of course, part of the “Greatest Generation,” and after spending an afternoon with him… I certainly know why.

From SEA to shining seaplane


Having arrived in the Emerald City nearly two months ago, I’ve been having the time of my life exploring my new hometown. I’ve of course spent countless hours taking photos at the local airports – SeaTac, Boeing Field and Paine Field – where I’ve seen plenty of new planes and old planes, fast planes and slow planes… this is truly an AvGeek’s paradise.

I recently celebrated my 34th birthday, and my husband came through with an incredibly special gift: a flight on a Kenmore Air seaplane. I had never been on a seaplane before, and the airline is currently running a special to commemorate its 75th anniversary: 30-minute scenic flights for $75 a person! 

We lucked out and got to fly on “Maggie” – the special King 5 Evening DHC-3 Turbo Otter. The experience of taking off and landing on the water, and flying low and slow around the city was so exciting. We really lucked out with the weather, too, as it was about 80 degrees with abundant sunshine. And yes, the mountain (or as I call it, “Rainy”) was out!

For those who live in the Seattle area, or for anyone visiting this year, I highly recommend checking out the Kenmore Air 75th Anniversary Scenic Flight deal. I know we’ll certainly do it again in the near future, and hopefully at some point we’ll take advantage of one of the other packages (the Mt. Rainier & St. Helens Volcano Tour is very high on my list!).

Here’s a short video I put together, documenting our adventure!

Although we’ve only been here a short time, we’ve managed to pack in a lot of fun activities, from hikes to bikes, both the Museum of Flight and MOHAI, ferry and water taxi rides, kayaking and now flying in a seaplane! Have a suggestion for something I should check out in the area? Let me know in the comments!

To blue skies and tailwinds…

On to the Emerald City…

Aviation enthusiast.

Storyteller.

Adventure seeker.

Those are the phrases I use to describe myself across my social media pages, and I do my best to live up to each one of them on a daily basis.

For the first, I usually find myself out at a St. Louis-area airport three-to-four times a week, and I love documenting those experiences and sharing them with others on Instagram who share my love for airplanes.

For the second, that’s where my day job comes in. As a historian at Boeing, I’m fortunate to be able to spend my time researching and writing about the company’s past. There’s a lot we can learn from history, and it’s my job to tell those stories and make them meaningful and relevant today.

For the third, I haven’t quite lived up to my own expectations over the last year or two, but that’s largely due to the pandemic, which wreaked havoc on the world and hit the travel industry particularly hard. However, I have had one BIG adventure in the works for awhile now, and it’s finally time to share that with you, my fellow aviation enthusiasts and travel lovers.

I’ve been with Boeing for about three-and-a-half years. I started in Chicago where I worked in executive communications for just over a year. The Windy City is, of course, the company’s headquarters, but nestled on the 30th floor of a downtown skyscraper, I didn’t really feel like I was working for an airplane manufacturer. A new opportunity to work in Historical Services led me to St. Louis at the end of 2018, and while I’m not nearly as passionate about military aircraft as I am about commercial, this has been an experience I wouldn’t trade for anything.

For the last two years, I’ve worked just steps from where the Mercury and Gemini spacecraft were built in the 1960s, and a stone’s throw from where Boeing builds the F-15, F/A-18 and T-7A today. Living in downtown St. Louis, I’m situated almost perfectly in between a number of airports where I’ve managed to photograph some incredible airplanes… from an OC-135B at MidAmerica (BLV) or a DC-3 downtown (CPS), to N757A — the first 757 built, which today is used as a testbed for the F-22 Raptor — at Lambert (STL) or a DC-9 at Spirit of St. Louis (SUS). This city is an aviation mecca.

Alas, all good things must come to an end. And as the saying goes, “When one door closes, another one opens.” Since I first started applying to jobs with Boeing half-a-decade ago, I’ve had my sights set on one city. Lucky for me, my husband Scott was just as interested in moving to this particular place. Over the last few months, planning has been in full swing, and today… well, today is the day.

Cruising above Missouri on a one-way flight to Seattle.

I’m sitting on an Alaska 737-900ER, cruising at 34,000 feet, on a one-way flight to Seattle. Our two cats, Penelope (aka Beans) and Luka (aka Buddy), are in the cargo hold, experiencing life in the sky for the first time. Scott, his dad and brother, are about to hit the road… driving our car and a truck 2,000 miles cross-country. I’ll land at my new home airport in about four hours. The guys will arrive in about four days. I feel like I’ve been waiting forever for this day to come, and in many ways I feel like we’re finally “going home.”

Buddy, Beans and I checking in for our big adventure!

Scott and I will always trace our roots back to Minnesota… that’s where we met in 2010 and where most of our family still resides. And since then, we’ve been on an incredible journey with some awesome “layovers” — first in Kansas City, then back to Minneapolis, on to Chicago and now here in St. Louis. It’s been fun, but we’re both very ready to land at our final destination: Seattle.

Stay tuned for new airplanes, new stories and new adventures. I consider myself very fortunate to be able to share this particular adventure with all of you, and am eternally grateful for your support.

To blue skies and tailwinds.